Book Giveaway Countdown3

COUNTDOWN DAY 3 to the 150th anniversary of the famous Battle of Lissa, and a chance to win a signed copy of the book about the ship’s surgeon who was there.

httpcroatian-treasure.comritcol.jpgThe Ferdinand Max scored a glancing blow against the Portogallo, then went to defend the big wooden Kaiser. Freed by an Italian ironclad’s withdrawal, the Kaiser, despite its lack of metal cladding, followed up Tegetthoff and rammed the Portogallo again — wood against metal, sheer madness! But brilliant fighting spirit.

 

 

For a chance to win a copy of The Extraordinary Dr Epstein, answer the quiz question on Wednesday 20 July 2016.

Excerpt from Chapter 20, Battle. Ephraim’s epic poem about the battle won him an award from Emperor Franz Joseph. Author great granddaughter still seeks that poem! Go HERE for a non-fiction page on the famous Battle of Lissa, why it was fought, what else it is famous for and what happened next.

Book Giveaway Countdown4

COUNTDOWN DAY 4 to the 150th anniversary of the famous Battle of Lissa, and a chance to win a signed copy of the book about the ship’s surgeon who was there.

Through the blaze of gunfire and smoke, Ephraim and the Seehund crew made out the Ferdinand Max rushing full speed ahead at the ironclad Italian Palestro, heard the blow, the crunch and creaks as Tegetthoff smashed her stern and set her on fire. The admiral pulled away and hunted another — his tactic, outnumbered by ships, men and guns was, against the odds, to ram the superior Italian fleet into defeat. Could Austria possibly succeed?lissa9

For a chance to win a copy of The Extraordinary Dr Epstein, answer the quiz question on Wednesday 20 July 2016.

Excerpt from Chapter 20, Battle. Ephraim’s epic poem about the battle won him an award from Emperor Franz Joseph. Author great granddaughter still seeks that poem! Go HERE for a non-fiction page on the famous Battle of Lissa, why it was fought, what else it is famous for and what happened next.

 

Book Giveaway Countdown5

COUNTDOWN DAY 5 to the 150th anniversary of the famous Battle of Lissa, and a chance to win a signed copy of the book about the ship’s surgeon who was there.

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On the morning of 20 July 1866 Tegetthoff ordered Austria’s armada into three divisions — his ironclads at the front, then unarmoured wooden ships, then smaller gunboats and auxiliaries. Ephraim readied his implements and bandages, then led prayers in the surgery with his assistant. Firing began and they went on deck. Seehund‘s orders were to stay on the fringes with the other smaller ships. After the crackle and boom of initial cannon fire, amid thick clouds of gunsmoke the two lines of ironclads closed, imperial Austrian black against Italy’s grim grey. In moments, Tegetthoff’s Ferdinand Max led his ships straight through a gap in the enemy line. Once through, each Austrian vessel turned to barrage the Italians broadside-to-broadside in rolling repeated roars.

For a chance to win a copy of The Extraordinary Dr Epstein, answer the quiz question on Wednesday 20 July 2016.

Excerpt from Chapter 20, Battle. Ephraim’s epic poem about the battle won him an award from Emperor Franz Joseph. Author great granddaughter still seeks that poem! Go HERE for a non-fiction page on the famous Battle of Lissa, why it was fought, what else it is famous for and what happened next.

Book Giveaway Countdown6

COUNTDOWN DAY 6 to the 150th anniversary of the famous Battle of Lissa, and a chance to win a signed copy of the book about the ship’s surgeon who was there.

lissa1The Seehund sailed alongside large vessels, a small, single-gunned wooden warship nipping among the tall-masted frigates. Tegetthoff’s fleet hove into view. Painted sleek, threatening black, in total they were twenty-six ships, and seven of them were ironclads. Word came: bombarding of Lissa’s port had begun. Further word: the Italian flotilla was twice as big as Austria’s. Worse, twelve of these were modern ironclads, nine even had iron hulls.

For a chance to win a copy of The Extraordinary Dr Epstein, answer the quiz question on Wednesday 20 July 2016.

Excerpt from Chapter 20, Battle. Ephraim’s epic poem about the battle won him an award from Emperor Franz Joseph. Author great granddaughter still seeks that poem! Go HERE for a non-fiction page on the famous Battle of Lissa, why it was fought, what else it is famous for and what happened next.

Book Giveaway Countdown7

One week til the 150th anniversary of the famous Battle of Lissa, and a chance to win a signed copy of the book about the ship’s surgeon who was there. Countdown Day 7.

lissa28After a whirl of uniform fittings, goodbyes and letters home, Dr Ephraim M Epstein was commissioned ship’s surgeon on board the Feuerspeier Battery, off Venice. No sooner had he gained his sea legs than he was transferred to the corvette Seehund. What different circumstances to his voyage across the Atlantic in the bowels of a leaky merchant ship; Ephraim savoured the taut sails, the wind, summer’s clear Mediterranean skies and the grand sight of the ships of the line as they patrolled the coast off Venice. But suddenly now they were sailing and steaming southeast to join the fleet directly under the command of Admiral Tegetthoff himself. The Italian navy had commenced besieging the island of Lissa, defence outpost of Austria’s key naval base on the Dalmatian coast.

For a chance to win a copy of The Extraordinary Dr Epstein, answer the quiz question on Wednesday 20 July 2016.

Excerpt from Chapter 20, Battle. Ephraim’s epic poem about the battle won him an award from Emperor Franz Joseph. Author great granddaughter still seeks that poem! Go HERE for a non-fiction page on the famous Battle of Lissa, why it was fought what else it is famous for and what happened next.

 

As rumors built,

httpsupload.wikimedia.orgwikipediacommons00fDie_Seeschlacht_bei_Lissa.jpg… and news broke of Bismarck’s outrageous actions Ephraim’s personal interest grew. Talk among the medics turned from the massive losses of the American Civil War to the horrible death count in the Crimean War only a decade ago. ‘The only good thing that comes of war is medical progress,’ his chief surgeon harrumphed. ‘And opportunities, especially for doctors.’

Ephraim saw younger physicians seeking military commissions. Here was his chance — a test of courage in battle conditions, a gain of medical experience, an escape from claustrophobic Vienna, and threats on two fronts, by land and by sea, with no other nation coming to Austria’s aid. This was the answer for Ephraim, a call and determination he’d not felt since his decision to go to America.

Vienna, 1866:  Dr Epstein dares to take up a new challenge which will see him shine in one of naval history’s most famous events, the Battle of Lissa. Its 150th anniversary is next month. In Chapter 19, Fierce as a Leopard, Light as an Eagle, Ephraim overcomes his own impatience and pride to pass official exams and be commissioned ship’s surgeon in the Austrian Imperial Navy. His epic poem about the battle won him an award from Emperor Franz Joseph. Author great granddaughter still seeks that poem. Contact via this site if you can help!

Dinners and parties,

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… concerts, lectures and dances. Ephraim had looks, intelligence, bright liveliness, he was a linguist, a scholar, physician, he told fascinating tales of America and Turkey… and he was unmarried. Through friends and medical colleagues he was introduced to sisters and daughters whenever he socialized. He met pretty women, and intelligent women, and pretty, intelligent women. But though he laughed, waltzed and conversed, he was not drawn to anyone. He realized he had lived so long as a married man with and without Rachel that he did not know how to fall in love.

Divorced from his cousin-wife, in Chapter 19, Fierce as a Leopard, Light as an Eagle, Ephraim is in Vienna, 1863-66. He’s a physician in the prestigious Vienna General Hospital and stuck back in Europe and Judaism because of the promise to his mother. But this restless man will soon drive himself to yet another drastic life change.

 

She explains…

Well, well the great granddaughter/author is talking about me again. Here in this interview and live on 16th June at Richmond Adult Community College http://www.racc.ac.uk Events.

The way she describes my life and times — as if it were an adventure!

Isolating existing cases…

…was paramount. They set up beds, carried in the sick, and, under Ephraim’s direction Rachel and the helpers ministered to them, sponging, cooling, getting liquids into them. There was no point in bleeding or cupping. At first ten a day died. After a week this slowed to four a day. By the end of a month, it was four a week. Those who survived were scarred, disfigured with pitted pocks all over the face where massage room at Royal Naval Hospital, Haslar. GJ Gordon. wellcome.ac.uk (2)the vicious disease always manifested most strongly. Some were blinded by smallpox, some crippled by its effect on joints. Overall a third of those infected would die. Among children Ephraim knew eighty per cent would die.

Ephraim is called to Macedonia to help in a smallpox outbreak. In Chapter 16, Epidemic, Rachel proves herself a worthy, skilful, kind assistant in the horrific and sad work. As the epidemic fades he has new respect for her. Despite her previous betrayals, perhaps the marriage can work…

Writing from Life

The extraordinary Ephraim Epstein is pleased, nay astonished, to have the writing of his life story discussed in Chiswick, London on Tuesday 15 March 2016, 6.30 – 8 pm. Great granddaughter-author Susan Lee Kerr joins local author Diane Chandler (The Road to Donetsk) to converse about putting fascinating ancestors and fantastic life experiences into a novel. Do come along.

12 Turnham Green Terrace, London W4 1QP

12 Turnham Green Terrace, London W4 1QP